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Salé

Home Base H. erectus Fossil Sites Salé

This topic contains 6 replies, has 1 voice, and was last updated by  Story of Sapiens 11 months ago.

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  • #502

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Salé

    Site Type:
    Fossil Site
    Location:
    Morocco
    Name:
    Salé
    Coordinates:
    https://www.openstreetmap.org/?mlat=34.033333&mlon=-6.8&zoom=12#map=7/34.033/-6.800

    Notable Discoveries:
    Salé Fossil

    Salé Fossil

    Site:
    Salé
    Species:
    H. erectus
    Year of Discovery:
    1971 [1]
    Discovered by:
    Quarrymen [1][3]
    Geological Age:
    Between 250,000 and 200,000 years old [1][4]
    400,000 years old [2][3]
    Cultural Attribution:

    Developmental Age:
    Adult [6]
    Presumed Sex:
    Female [5]
    Preserved Skeletal Party:
    Cranium
    Preservation:
    Partial
    Preservation Details:

    Anatomical Description:

    Additional Notes:

     [1]

     [4]

    Sources:
    [1] – http://humanorigins.si.edu/evidence/human-fossils/fossils/sal%C3%A9
    [2] – https://www.britannica.com/place/Sale-paleoanthropological-site-Morocco
    [3] – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_human_evolution_fossils#Lower_Paleolithic:_2.58_%E2%80%93_0.3_million_years_old
    [4] – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sale_skull.jpg
    [5] – Encyclopedia of Human Evolution and Prehistory: Second Edition
    [6] – http://www.pnas.org/content/106/16/6429

    #504

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Source: [1]

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    #510

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Source: [4]
    Skulls of our Ancestors

    Author: Ryan Somma from Occoquan, USA

    Attachments:
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    #515

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Homo erectus Salé– also discovered in Morocco, not far from Jebel Irhoud – dates back to 250,000 years ago and might have coexisted with the early form ofHomo sapiens, although the identification and age of the Salé specimen remains highly debated.

    Source: http://theconversation.com/new-moroccan-fossils-suggest-humans-lived-and-evolved-across-africa-100-000-years-earlier-than-we-thought-78826

    #517

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    The Salé individual was likely a female who reached adulthood even though she suffered cranial distortion and muscular trauma related to a congenital torticollis

    Source: http://www.pnas.org/content/106/16/6429

    #518

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Muscle markings are slight, suggesting derivation from a female individual.

    Source: Encyclopedia of Human Evolution and Prehistory: Second Edition
    Edited by Eric Delson, Ian Tattersall, John Van Couvering, Alison S. Brooks

    #530

    Story of Sapiens
    Keymaster

    Source: [5]

    Salé

    Open-air site near Rabat (Morocco) in which a partial hominid skull was exposed by  quarrying activities in 1971. These dunes are associated with the Middle Pleistocene Tensiftian transgression, tentatively dated to 400Ka. The Salé fossil may thus be similar in age to the nearby sites at the Thomas Quarries and Sidi Abderrahman. A small faunal assemblage was recovered in the same deposits, but no stone tools were found. The skull is small, with a cranial capacity of only ca. 900ml, but the vault is long, low, and relatively thick walled. Muscle markings are slight, suggesting derivation from a female individual. While most of these characters suggest assignment of the Salé skull to Homo erectus, there are also some more advanced characters that are found in Homo sapiens specimens. These include the basicranial proportions, an expanded parietal region, and a rounded occipital region with minimal development of an occipital torus. The occipital, however, is quite abnormal in its proportions, suggesting the presence of pathology. Because of its mosaic characteristics, the Salé skull’s classification is not generally agreed upon. Some workers regard it as an evolved H. erectus specimen, while others believe it represents an “archaic Homo sapiens.”

    See also Africa, North; Archaic Homo sapiens; Homo erectus; Sidi Abderrahman; Thomas Quarries. [C.B.S., J.J.S.]

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